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Professor Alexandra Gerbasi

Professor Alexandra Gerbasi

Professor of Leadership


Streatham Court, University of Exeter, Rennes Drive, Exeter, EX4 4PU, UK

Alexandra Gerbasi joined the University of Exeter in 2017. Previously, she has held posts at the University of Surrey, Grenoble Ecole de Management and California State University, Northridge. She received her Ph.D. is sociology from Stanford University and her undergraduate degree from Duke University. Her research focuses on the effects of positive and negative network ties within the workplace, and their effects on performance, leadership, well-being, thriving, affect and turnover. In addition, her research addresses how individuals recognize opportunities for collaboration and advancement in their networks.  Her research has appeared in Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Management, Journal of Organizational Behavior, The Leadership Quarterly, Social Psychology Quarterly, and, Organizational Dynamics.  Her research has been supported by the National Science Foundation and Agence Nationale de la Recherche. 

Nationality: American

Administrative responsibilities

  • Research Director of the Centre for Leadership Studies

Qualifications

Ph.D., MA, BA

Links

Research interests

  • Leader emergence
  • Well-being and thriving
  • Civility and incivility
  • Social Networks
  • Negative workplace interactions

Research projects

I am currently working on several projects including:

  • How emergent or informal leaders are better placed to handle the strain of boundary spanning behaviours than do formal leaders who do not have the collective support of their colleagues.
  • How both hierarchy and role stressors influence civil behaviours.
  • How an individual’s position in the positive and negative energy networks influences voluntary and involuntary turnover.

Key publications | Publications by category | Publications by year

Publications by category


Journal articles

Cullen-Lester KL, Leroy H, Gerbasi A, Nishii L (2016). Energy's role in the extraversion (dis)advantage: How energy ties and task conflict help clarify the relationship between extraversion and proactive performance. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 37(7), 1003-1022. DOI.
Chrobot-Mason D, Gerbasi A, Cullen-Lester KL (2016). Predicting leadership relationships: the importance of collective identity. The Leadership Quarterly, 27(2), 298-311. DOI.
Gerbasi A, Porath CL, Parker A, Spreitzer G, Cross R (2015). Destructive de-energizing relationships: How thriving buffers their effect on performance. Journal of Applied Psychology, 100(5), 1423-1433. Full text. DOI.
Porath CL, Gerbasi A (2015). Does civility pay?. Organizational Dynamics, 44(4), 281-286. DOI.
Oshri I, Kotlarsky J, Gerbasi A (2015). Strategic innovation through outsourcing: the role of relational and contractual governance. The Journal of Strategic Information Systems, 24(3), 203-216. DOI.
Porath CL, Gerbasi A, Schorch SL (2015). The effects of civility on advice, leadership, and performance. Journal of Applied Psychology, 100(5), 1527-1541. DOI.
Gerbasi A, Latusek D (2015). Trust-building in international business ventures. Baltic Journal of Management, 10(1), 30-51. DOI.
Parker A, Gerbasi A, Porath CL (2013). The effects of de-energizing ties in organizations and how to manage them. Organizational Dynamics, 42(2), 110-118. Full text. DOI.
Cross R, Gray P, Gerbasi A, Assimakopoulos D (2012). Building engagement from the ground up. Organizational Dynamics, 41(3), 202-211. DOI.

Publications by year


2016

Cullen-Lester KL, Leroy H, Gerbasi A, Nishii L (2016). Energy's role in the extraversion (dis)advantage: How energy ties and task conflict help clarify the relationship between extraversion and proactive performance. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 37(7), 1003-1022. DOI.
Chrobot-Mason D, Gerbasi A, Cullen-Lester KL (2016). Predicting leadership relationships: the importance of collective identity. The Leadership Quarterly, 27(2), 298-311. DOI.

2015

Gerbasi A, Porath CL, Parker A, Spreitzer G, Cross R (2015). Destructive de-energizing relationships: How thriving buffers their effect on performance. Journal of Applied Psychology, 100(5), 1423-1433. Full text. DOI.
Porath CL, Gerbasi A (2015). Does civility pay?. Organizational Dynamics, 44(4), 281-286. DOI.
Oshri I, Kotlarsky J, Gerbasi A (2015). Strategic innovation through outsourcing: the role of relational and contractual governance. The Journal of Strategic Information Systems, 24(3), 203-216. DOI.
Porath CL, Gerbasi A, Schorch SL (2015). The effects of civility on advice, leadership, and performance. Journal of Applied Psychology, 100(5), 1527-1541. DOI.
Gerbasi A, Latusek D (2015). Trust-building in international business ventures. Baltic Journal of Management, 10(1), 30-51. DOI.

2013

Parker A, Gerbasi A, Porath CL (2013). The effects of de-energizing ties in organizations and how to manage them. Organizational Dynamics, 42(2), 110-118. Full text. DOI.

2012

Cross R, Gray P, Gerbasi A, Assimakopoulos D (2012). Building engagement from the ground up. Organizational Dynamics, 41(3), 202-211. DOI.

External positions

  • Executive Committee, Organizational Behavior Division, Academy of Management
  • Associate Editor M@n@gement

I have taught research methods and statistics over the past 10 years. I constantly evolved the classes in order to better meet the needs of business students. The current instantiation of the course involves the integration of real world case studies) so that students can better appreciate the variety of uses of quantitative skills in business and management. Being able to use and collect data effectively are key skills necessary to get ahead today, and I design my classes so that students can excel in that arena.