Maria

MSc Accounting and Taxation

Maria decided to develop her studies in taxation after studying her undergraduate course in Politics, Philosophy and Economics at Exeter. She has enjoyed the international feel of the campus and has made connections from all over the world that will last her a lifetime

Why did you pick Exeter over other Universities?

I chose to study at Exeter as I had done my undergraduate course here in Politics, Philosophy and Economics and felt strongly about progressing my studies at the Business School. The Accounting and Taxation course was exactly what I was looking for and Exeter is one the few places I saw that teaches taxation from an accountancy perspective. It is also great if you do not have a background in law and are interested in the intricacies of the trade in a changing environment.

What were you doing before you started your postgraduate studies at Exeter?

I was studying my Undergraduate degree here but during the summer before starting my Masters programme, I was working in a boutique estate agency in London.

Why did you pick this postgraduate course?

I have always been intrigued to study taxation, and a funny fact my birthday actually coincides with the end of the tax year – 5th April, this was something I found out in one of my first UK taxation lessons. The modules that are offered in term two have showed me the areas of taxation I really wanted to focus on.

How have you found the teaching, research, lecturers, course content?

All the modules are very different which gives you a lot of variety, I would have to say my favourite module is Advanced UK Taxation as it took the knowledge I obtained in the first term and it applied it to a consultancy viewpoint. Experiences like this show us exactly how our learning is applied to the real world and how we will have to think when we are working in the field. The teachers provide great support and the lectures are really engaging.

How have you found the support services and the facilities?

The support provided at Exeter has been much more than I could have imagined. There are different support systems available for any issues you have and responses are always heartfelt and genuine which is something I have found really helpful. I would say don’t be scared to ask fellow students or teachers for support, everyone is always willing to help.

The computers and work spaces have been very well developed and there are plenty of places you can find to work in-between lectures.

Are you a member of any societies, volunteering, or hold any part-time jobs?

I have been in a number of societies. One I have stuck to throughout my four years is the Debating Society- they have become like a little family to me. I am also a member of the Business and Finance and Women in Business Societies who have given me a great reach to potential employers and another way to network. Language societies such as Spanish and Italian have been great fun to practice what I know and learn a bit more about other cultures.

I have had two part-time jobs this year; something I never took up during my bachelor’s, which has helped me structure my free time. I have found that it made me more productive with the time I have here. I worked in Jo Malone in John Lewis and in The White Company. I had a couple of interviews and it was quite an easy process.

What has been the biggest highlight of studying at Exeter?

Making friends I know will stay with me for a lifetime.

Have you used the Career Zone? How has it benefited you?

Yes, I have applied to jobs on the website and have browsed through the information they have in assistance of finding jobs which has been really helpful.

Do you feel your postgraduate course will enhance your employability?

I really think it will. In all honesty, I have noticed when I have been applying for jobs that people react very positively when they see the course I have studied and I have been told that my CV stands out from the crowd by several recruiters.

What do you think of the campus?

The campus at Exeter is very green but has some hills, so not only do you get to experience the fresh air but you get exercise built in. My favourite spot on campus is the postgraduate room in Amory which has its own balcony. It was really warm in September so I was able to eat my lunch and catch a tan whilst overlooking the campus.

How have you found the city and the surrounding area?

Exeter was the perfect size for me as a University town. There is an abundance of shops pinpointed around the city and everything you need is within a 20-minute walk.  Exeter is a lovely place to spend your time and for under four pounds you can buy a return ticket to the seaside at Exmouth. After examinations it is the most blissful place to go.

How have you found Exeter as an international student?

The international student’s office were great, they helped me with all my visa applications. They have also been on hand for any questions I have had so far. The campus has become progressively more international, especially the Business School. This will be of great benefit to me in later life as I have already built a number of connections and grown my LinkedIn network significantly.

What advice would you give to a prospective student considering your course and the University of Exeter Business School?

Meet people. People provide new experiences and options of the world. University is the best time to not only become more knowledgeable in your field but to grow as a person and all of this is in your hands to do. Make the most detailed notes you can from the very beginning. They really do come in handy during revision.

Also make sure you try out the buffalo chicken wings in The Gove, it’s a great place to visit post lectures to mingle with your friends and classmates.

What do you want to do when you graduate?

I am planning to go into tax consultancy in London with the view to owning my own firm in the future. At the moment I am applying for graduate schemes, however I do want to take a short break before I secure a role.

Sum up your experience at Exeter in just four words:

Hard to beat it!