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RMC Workshops

Workshops

A key element of the RMC's mission is to provide hands-on workshops with experts in their fields. The workshops are initially offered to staff members and graduate students of the Business School, and, in many cases, are opened to the rest of the university if there is room.

Upcoming workshops

Presenter(s)

Date

Time

Workshop

Giuseppe (Joe) Labianca (Umass-Amherst/DRP)

 

20 January 2022

 

Social Network Analysis

27 January 2022

 

3 Feburary 2022

 
Claudio Panico (Bocconi)

22-23 Feburary 2022

 

Formal Modeling for Management

Denisa Mindruta (HEC Paris)

23-24 March 2022

 

Econometrics of Matching Games

Felix Vardy (IMF)

28 March 2022

 

Policy Careers

3 April 2022

 
Joerg Claussen (LMU) 4-6 April 2022   Webcrawling with Python 
Chris Rider (Michigan) 4-5 May 2022   Numerical Narratives
Elena Spatoulas Patel (Utah) 22-26 May 2022   Intermediate Econometrics II
Markus Fitza (Frankfurt School) 14 June 2022    
Herman Aguinis 27-28 June 2022   Open Science

Previous workshops

Presenter(s)

Date

Time

Workshop

Niels Van Quaquebeke

5 January 2021

2:00 to 3:00pm

Respectful inquiry: The story and the story behind the story

Hannes Leroy

6 January 2021

3:00 to 4:00pm 

Story behind the paper: Publishing in Journal of Applied Psychology

Berrin Erdogan

7 January 2021

2:00 to 4:00pm 

Story behind the paper: How to respond to reviewer comments

Tom Vanacker

14 January 2021

2:00 to 4:00pm 

How to frame papers that draw data from financial databases

Priya Kannan, Ronit Kark

27 January 2021

2:30 to 4:00pm  

Action research and taking research into practice 

Jessica Methot, Jill Perry-Smith, Stefano Tasselli

3 Feburary 2021

2:30 to 4:00pm (Panel Workshop)

Tips on writing theory papers

Jamie Ladge

9 Feburary 2021

2:30 to 3.30pm

Developing interview protocols

Joe Labianca

18 Feburary 2021

2:00 to 4:00pm

Tips on being a reviewer

Alessandro Lomi

26 Feburary 2021

3:00 to 4:00pm 

Best practices in network modelling

Ana Ortiz de Guinea Lopez de Arana

2 March 2021

1:30 to 3:30pm

Topic TBC, probably meta-analysis 

Ana Ortiz de Guinea Lopez de Arana

3 March 2021

2:30 to 4:00pm

Topic TBC, probably meta-analysis 

Joe Labianca, Stefano Tasselli

9 March 2021

1:00 to 3:30pm   

Research design and action research within organizations 

Hannes Leroy

25 March 2021

3:00 to 4:00pm 

How to frame and develop a literature review 

Gabriel Katz

29 March 2021

9:00am to 5:00pm

R training (part 1)

Gabriel Katz

30 March 2021

9:00am to 5:00pm

R training (part 2)

Ben Meehan

31 March 2021

9:00am to 5:00pm

NVIVO training (part 1)

Ben Meehan

01 April 2021

9:00am to 5:00pm

NVIVO training (part 2)

Iulia Cioroianu (Institute for Policy Research, University of Bath)

01 April 2021

 

Introduction to Python

Iulia Cioroianu (Institute for Policy Research, University of Bath) 02 April 2021  

Language Processing / Machine learning in Python

Ben Meehan (QDATRAINING Ltd) 03 April 2021  

Introduction to Nvivo

 

Iulia Cioroianu

22 April 2021

9:00am to 5:00pm

Python training (part 1)

Iulia Cioroianu

23 April 2021

9:00am to 5:00pm

Python training (part 2)

Jonas Lang

4 May 2021

1:30 to 3:30pm

Multilevel models (basic)

Jonas Lang

11 May 2021

1:30 to 3:30pm

Multilevel models (intermediate 1)

Jonas Lang

18 May 2021

1:30 to 3:30pm

Multilevel models (intermediate 2)

Jonas Lang

25 May 2021

1:30 to 3:30pm

Multilevel models (advanced)

Jonas Lang (Ghent/DRP)

13 September 2021

 

Structural Equation Modeling

Greg Molecke

11 October 2021

   

Herman Aguinis (George Washington/DRP)

25 October 2021

  Management Theory Development

Colleen Cunningham (LBS)

15 November 2021

  Finite mixture models 

Elena Spatoulas Patel

22-23 November 2021

  Intermediate Econmetrics 

Presenter(s)

Date

Time

Workshop

John Antonakis

(Editor-in-chief: The Leadership Quarterly)

4 Feburary 2020  

The Endogeneity problem in mediation analysis 

Random effects assumption in multilevel models 

Gabriel Katz (Q-Step Centre, University of Exeter) 30 March 2020  

Introduction to R/ Regression analysis in R (Stata)

Gabriel Katz (Q-Step Centre, University of Exeter)

31 March 2020

 

Factor analysis / Structural equation modelling in R (Stata)

Jill Perry Smith, Berrin Erdogan

30 September 2020

Jill: 2:30 to 3:10pm,                  

Berrin: 3:20 to 4:00pm

Meet the editor: Insights from an Associate Editor of Academy of Management Journal and Editor-in-Chief of Personnel Psychology

Our first Research Methods Centre workshop will feature two of our Distinguished Research Professors.

Jill Perry-Smith was an Associate Editor, Academy of Management Journal (2016-2019), and has been a board member of Organization Science, Journal of Applied Psychology, Academy of Management Review, and Academy of Management Journal. Jill will present ideas on how to tackle journal revisions and common reasons that articles get rejected and how to address them. There will be the opportunity to ask questions at the end.

Berrin Erdogan is the Editor-in-Chief of Personnel Psychology. Berrin will provide information about publishing in Personnel Psychology. These unique insights are relevant for publishing in other psychology and management journals. The talk will contain tips relating to idea generation, research design, writing, and revising articles to increase success in the publication process. There will be the opportunity to ask questions at the end.

Jessica Methot, Jamie Ladge

06 October 2020

2:00pm to 3:30pm (Panel Workshop)

Practical implications of research and getting media attention

An important element of our job as academics is to conduct research that builds and extends knowledge of a vast range of management-oriented phenomena. However, some scholars struggle to understand the practical significance of their work and how to translate and disseminate their research to practitioners. This presentation is designed to help scholars talk about the relevance of their work to non-academic audiences – including practice-based business magazines and journals as well as the popular press. Professors Ladge and Methot will describe their experiences sharing their research with these various outlets. They will discuss approaches to writing and connecting with practitioner audiences, and methods of “translating” academic insights in ways that spark interest with practicing managers. They will also offer strategies for how to leverage the use of practice-oriented writings and media attention (e.g. for classroom use, research, and/or to gain credibility in the field).

Markus Fitza

15 October 2020

2:30 to 4:00pm

Current approaches to publishing quantitative analysis (e.g., replication, p-values)

In recent years a variety of voices raised concerns about the reproducibility of results in management studies (e.g., Banks et al.,2016; Bettis, 2012; Bettis, Helfat, and Shaver, 2016; Goldfarb and King, 2016). These concerns echo a discussion in other scientific fields. For example, Ioannidis (2005) estimates that more than 50% of studies in the clinical sciences may be false positives (type I errors) and will thus not reproduce. At the core of this discussion are concerned about how traditional statistical model fitting techniques are used in management research. But progress has already been made, for example, the Strategic Management Journal dropped the practice of using p-value cutoffs and now encourages replications. In this workshop, I will discuss some of the issues underlying this discussion, what suggestions have been made to tackle the problem and what the emerging changes in various journals mean for our research practice.

Tom Vanacker

22 October 2020

2:00 to 4:00pm

Creative use of databases (relevant to HR, finance, entrepreneurship, organisational behaviour)

Scholars in a wide range of fields often focus on publicly traded firms—generally pushed by data availability. While publicly traded firms were all once young, small, and privately held, we cannot simply generalize what we know from publicly traded firms to privately held firms. Moreover, privately held firms represent 97.5% of all incorporated entities in the United Kingdom. Data availability (and quality) related to privately held firms has increased dramatically in recent years. In this seminar, I will discuss some interesting databases on privately-held firms; how they might be used to develop new theory; highlight common (sometimes false) critiques on these databases; and, how they might be used creatively (based on my own experience) to get published in a broad range of journals, including Academy of Management Journal, Strategic Management Journal, Organization Science, Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, Journal of Business Venturing, Journal of Banking and Finance, and Journal of World Business. ‚Äč

Nils Van Quaquebeke, Jonas Lang

29 October 2020

2:30 to 4:00pm (Panel Workshop)

Meet the editor: Beyond the questionnaire at Leadership Quarterly and insights from the publication process at Journal of Applied Psychology and Organizational Research Methods

The Journal of Applied Psychology and The Leadership Quarterly are top journals in management and applied psychology. Join this Q&A session with Jonas W. Lang (Associate Editor at JAP) and Niels Van Quaquebeke (Senior Associate Editor at LQ) and ask them everything you always wanted to know about how best to navigate the publication process in these journals? What do the editors look for in manuscripts? What can you as a submitter do to increase the likelihood of your manuscript getting into review and ultimately accepted? This session is yours. So take ownership. A week before a slid.do link will be posted here where you can (anonymously) post your questions.

Markus Fitza

05 October 2020

2:30 to 4:00pm

Variance decomposition analysis

Variance decomposition is frequently used in management research. It is usually used to determine the impact of a given effect class on a dependent variable. An example might be useful to illustrate the utility of this approach relative to more conventional approaches such as linear regression: One use of variance decomposition in management studies was to determine the importance of CEOs for firm performance (e.g., Ahn et al., 2004; Lieberson and O'Connor, 1972; Mackey, 2008; Thomas, 1988; Wasserman et al., 2001). While some studies try to answer this question by analyzing the performance effect of certain CEO characteristics (such as age, experience or education etc…) a variance decomposition follows a more general approach. Because CEO characteristics are a complex set of features, some of which can increase performance while others can decrease it, it is difficult to determine the overall magnitude of the impact of CEOs with a regression analysis that uses proxies for the full set of all possible underlying CEO features that may affect performance.

Rather a variance decomposition study of CEO influence captures the performance effect of CEOs in its totality. Instead of asking which features of a CEO effect firm performance it asks what is the overall impact of CEOs. This approach helps to answer a fundamental question: If we want to understand differences in firm performance, how much can studies of for example CEOs help us towards that goal? In the past this approach was use to measure the impact of a variety of effect classes on firm performance such as the effect of industry, region, corporate parent, business group, CEOs, VCs, etc. While performance is usually the main dependent variable of interest variance decomposition can also be used to investigate alternative DVs, for example to estimate how much certain effect classes influence the degree of diversification or M&A activities.

In this workshop I will discuss the use of variance decomposition in management research: What types of research questions it can help answer, various methodological approaches, and how one can manage the review process for variance decomposition paper given that the method is not necessarily known to all reviewers.

Anthony Heyes

12 November 2020

2:30 to 4:00pm

Research design for causal inference: Methods from economics for non-economists (part 1)

Much empirical research coming out of business schools presents evidence of correlation (X is associated with Y) but is written up in a way that implies a causal relationship (X causes Y).

Economics has moved decisively away from correlational analysis towards methods that explicitly allow for causal inference. Much of this work is very creative, making clever use of ‘natural experiments’. Now the norm in economics, such designs are increasingly prominent in top journals in other business school disciplines. The presentation will sketch the methods (IV, RDD and DiD) in a non-technical manner and explore how they might make your own empirical research more marketable. Focus will be on research design – setting up a study that has causal interpretability “baked in” from the start – and we will touch on lots of examples. The talks are mainly for people less familiar with these approaches, but everyone is welcome.

Anthony Heyes

19 November 2020

2:30 to 4:00pm

Research design for causal inference: Methods from economics for non-economists (part 2)

Much empirical research coming out of business schools presents evidence of correlation (X is associated with Y) but is written up in a way that implies a causal relationship (X causes Y).

Economics has moved decisively away from correlational analysis towards methods that explicitly allow for causal inference. Much of this work is very creative, making clever use of ‘natural experiments’. Now the norm in economics, such designs are increasingly prominent in top journals in other business school disciplines. The presentation will sketch the methods (IV, RDD and DiD) in a non-technical manner and explore how they might make your own empirical research more marketable. Focus will be on research design – setting up a study that has causal interpretability “baked in” from the start – and we will touch on lots of examples. The talks are mainly for people less familiar with these approaches, but everyone is welcome.

Priya Kannan

25 November 2020

3:00 to 4:00pm 

Developing research questions and construct clarity

Theoretically, how individuals reconstruct available resources to effect new opportunities has been at the heart of entrepreneurship and innovation research for the past two decades (e.g. Baker and Nelson, 2005, Feldman, 2004; Feldman and Worline, 2011, Garud and Karnoe, 2003). Practically, nothing highlights the need to reconstruct resources quickly and effectively to pursue new opportunities such as unexpected crises, the most recent case being the pandemic. Entrepreneurial firms, as well as, large organizations swiftly reconfigured their resources and shifted them to pursue new entrepreneurial opportunities brought forth by the pandemic. For example, General Motors swiftly reconfigured their resources and shifted them to producing ventilators while some award winning, high end dining restaurants foresaw new opportunities in burgers, take outs, and reconfigured resources to pursue these unexpected opportunities. Resource reconstruction is addressed by several terms such as effectuation (Sarasvathy, 2001), bricolage (Baker &Nelson, 2005), and resourcing (Feldman, 2004) and others. Based on a working paper, the purpose of this talk is to delineate the differences in how resources can be understood and constructed differently based on the phenomenon that is under consideration.

Ronit Kark

01 December 2020

1:00 to 2:00pm   

Publishing qualitative research: Success, rejections and lessons learned

Giuseppe Cavaliere

08 December 2020

1:00 to 3:30pm   

Bootstrap methods for economists (part 1)

Presenter(s)

Date

Time

Workshop

Iulia Cioroianu, University of Bath

1 April 2019

 

Introduction to Python

Iulia Cioroianu, University of Bath

2 April 2019

 

Collecting and analysing social media data using Python

Required: Intro to Python

Eva Neitzert, London School of Economics and Just Economics

3 April 2019

 

Evaluation and impact assessment 

Julian Jamison, University of Exeter, Economics

4 April 2019

 

Experimental methods

Pikakshi Manchanda, CSAM, University of Exeter

5 April 2019

 

Introduction to Natural Language Processing in Python

Required: Intro to Python

Ben Meehan, QDA Training

8 April 2019

 

Introduction to NVivo

Ben Meehan, QDA Training

9 April 2019

 

NVivo Underway – analysing your data NVivo

Required: Intro NVivo. Max 16 people

Gabriel Katz, Q-Step Centre, University of Exeter

10 April 2019

 

Multilevel Models in R and Stata

Gabriel Katz, Q-Step Centre, University of Exeter 11 April 2019   Bayesian Statistics in R and Stata
Lakshmi Balachandran Nair, University of Utrecht 12 April 2019   Case Study Research Design

Iulia Cioroianu (University of Bath)

8 July 2019

 

Online surveys in Qualtrics, survey experiments, and causal inference

Lakshmi Balachandran Nair (University of Utrecht) 9 July 2019   Introduction to Grounded theory
Alasdair Jones (London School of Economics) 10 July 2019   Participant observation
Alasdair Jones (London School of Economics) 11 July 2019   Approaches in qualitative evaluation
Houston Lester (Baylor College of Medicine) 12 July 2019   Longitudinal Analysis in R

Mike Gill (University of Oxford)

9 September 2019

 

Of qualitative methods and phenomenology (Canceled)

Jeremy Dawson (University of Sheffield)  10 September 2019   Mediation and moderation
Lorien Jasny (Q-Step Centre, University of Exeter) 11 September 2019   Introduction to social network analysis
Lorien Jasny (Q-Step Centre, University of Exeter) 12 September 2019  

Intermediate social network analysis

Required: Intro to Social Network Analysis

Pikakshi Manchanda (CSAM, University of Exeter) 13 September 2019  

Advanced NLP and Machine Learning for text analysis

Required: Intro to Python

Title

Presenter

Qualitative Research Design Nelson Phillips
Introduction to R (group 1) Iulia Cioroianu
Introduction to R (group 2) Gabriel Katz
Structural Equation Modelling Gabriel Katz
Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) Sean White