Consumption, Markets and Culture

Module description

Summary:

This module will equip future marketing practitioners with the skills and knowledge to understand the interactions that occur between the market, consumers and the marketplace. The focus of this module centres on cultural approaches to understanding and we will explore the dynamics associated with the symbolic production and consumption of culture. Working with popular texts such as The Paradox of Choice by Barry Schwarz as well as with complex theoretical concepts including Consumer Culture Theory and Prospect Theory, this module will provide students with an intellectually and historically grounded ability to understand the broader socio-cultural issues relevant to marketing practice in the 21st century.

Additional Information:

Internationalisation:

The module draws on the work of international scholars and looks at the context of consumption in the context of globalization.

Sustainability:

A key consideration to consumption practices is the notion of sustainability. In this course we will consider the ethics surrounding consumption practices and its relationship to sustainable environments.

Employability:

This module helps students understand how organisations use data and what this means in different aspects of companies, (such as advertising, supply chain, and budgets) and how this relates to specific job titles.

Full module specification

Module title:Consumption, Markets and Culture
Module code:BEMM164
Module level:M
Academic year:2019/0
Module lecturers:
  • Emma Wood -
Module credit:15
ECTS value:

7.5

Pre-requisites:

None

Co-requisites:

None

Duration of module: Duration (weeks) - term 1:

11

Module aims

This module will equip future marketing practitioners with the skills and knowledge to understand the interactions that occur between the market, consumers and the marketplace. The focus of this module centres on cultural approaches to understanding and we will explore the broader socio-cultural issues relevant to marketing practice in the 21st century.

ILO: Module-specific skills

  • 1. have an understanding of marketing not just as a management practice but also as highly influential and intersecting with political, economic, technological and societal issues
  • 2. devise, sustain and justify arguments relating to broader social issues relevant to marketing practice
  • 3. have a clear grasp of a wide range of literature and debates associated with consumption, markets and culture
  • 4. recognise the significance of particular theoretical and/or practical strands within recent marketing research

ILO: Discipline-specific skills

  • 5. bring original ideas, and make some novel links between academic literature of a wide variety of forms and traditions
  • 6. relate theories to specific case studies, research data, literature bases and also to mainstream political, cultural and popular discourse
  • 7. sketch relatively large academic debates with clarity and coherence

ILO: Personal and key skills

  • 8. have the practical ability to analyse, communicate and present ideas, theories and principles
  • 9. have the initiative and ability to make connections and synthesise ideas and issues from a much larger body of work
  • 10. develop independent/self-directed learning skills, including time management, working to deadlines, and keeping abreast of a wide range of literature

Learning activities and teaching methods (given in hours of study time)

Scheduled Learning and Teaching ActivitiesGuided independent studyPlacement / study abroad
261240

Details of learning activities and teaching methods

CategoryHours of study timeDescription
Scheduled learning and teaching activities22Lectures
Guided independent study124Reading, researching and writing assignments
Tutorials4Student Lead Seminars

Formative assessment

Form of assessmentSize of the assessment (eg length / duration)ILOs assessedFeedback method
Participation in group workSeminars and 20 minute report back1-9In-class Verbal Feedback

Summative assessment (% of credit)

CourseworkWritten examsPractical exams
80020

Details of summative assessment

Form of assessment% of creditSize of the assessment (eg length / duration)ILOs assessedFeedback method
Written paper802,500 words1-10Written feedback
Reflective learning log based on group work201000 words8-9Written feedback

Details of re-assessment (where required by referral or deferral)

Original form of assessmentForm of re-assessmentILOs re-assessedTimescale for re-assessment
Written paperA resubmission of the Written Paper, 2500 words1-10
Reflective learning log1000 word book report8,9

Syllabus plan

The following subjects will be taught throughout the course of the term:

  • The importance of choice in marketing
  • Sustainable consumption and consumer expectations
  • Consumption as an expression of self
  • Ethical marketing practices and persuasion
  • The Impact of Big Data on the marketplace
  • The changing face of marketing communications
  • The role of trust in modern marketing

Indicative learning resources - Basic reading

Potential texts include:

Smart, B (2010) Consumer Society: critical Issues and environmental consequences. Sage. London

Sanborn, F.W. and Harris R.J. (2019) A Cognitive Psychology of Mass Communication: Second Edition. Routledge:Abingdon

Book Group texts include:

 Carr, N G.(2010) The shallows :what the Internet is doing to our brains.  New York : W.W. Norton,

Schwartz, B. (2004) The paradox of choice : why more is less. New York :Ecco.

Botsman, R. (2018) Who can you trust. London: Penguin Books

Cialdini, R. B. (1993). Influence: Science and practice (3rd ed.). New York, NY, US: HarperCollins College Publishers.

Raworth, K. (2017). Doughnut economics: seven ways to think like a 21st-century economist. London: Random House

Module has an active ELE page?

Yes

Origin date

17/07/2014

Last revision date

16/07/2019