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Dr Olayinka Oyekola

Dr Olayinka Oyekola

Lecturer in Economics

6287

+44 (0) 1392 726287

0.75
Streatham Court, University of Exeter, Rennes Drive, Exeter, EX4 4PU, UK

My research interests are broadly fixed in the field of Applied Economics, where I look at an eclectic collection of questions. On the one hand, I am curious to understand how the dynamics of key macroeconomic indicators are moulded by the underlying forces in the inputs market, with a special focus on fluctuations in the prices/quantities of commodities. Consequently, my interest in applied macroeconomics involves working on issues in environmental and resource economics and energy economics. On the other hand, I am inquisitive about how history joins with the present in shaping cultural, demographic, economic, financial, health, political, and social outcomes of individuals and nations. The goal is to utilise different econometric methods in analysing micro- and macro-level datasets to produce and publicise empirically sound, policy-relevant studies for developed and developing economies.

So far, I have studied how financial market regulations affect income inequality, the long-term impacts of the European share of colonial population on contemporary life expectancy and mortality, the income-effects of globalisation, education, and institutions, the relative importance of foreign and domestic shocks for explaining business cycle dynamics, the role of historical state capacity for the persistence of culture today (with reference to religion), and the influence of democracy on inequality and health outcomes. My on-going research focuses on issues relating to economics of crime, policy evaluation, with particular reference to housing-market outcomes, and policy risk in climate change policies.

Over the last decade, and within UK higher education, I have had the pleasure of assisting and leading in developing, designing, teaching, and assessing on a range of courses at both the undergraduate and postgraduate levels, including International Trade and Policy, Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, Economic History, Investments, International Finance, Industrial Economics, Mathematical Finance, and Quantitative Methods, as well as an inter-disciplinary course unit, Power and Value: Perspectives from Social Sciences, Economics and History, which combined topics in economics, politics, sociology, social anthropology, criminology, and social statistics, amongst others.

Overall, my teaching objective is always to enthuse students, spark curiosity in their thoughts, and help with improving their learning and academic outcomes in order to reach their potential. Economics of education is thus another area of research interest for me. My main focus is on topics at the intersection of curriculum decolonisation, wider participation, internationalisation, student engagement, experiences, and outcomes.

In September 2022, I joined the University of Exeter Business School as a Lecturer in Economics. Before this appointment, I have previously taught at Cardiff University, where I received degrees in Economics, and the University of Manchester.

I am married with two children, and part of a local church in Exeter.

Qualifications

BSc, MSc, MRes, and PhD (Cardiff University), FHEA

Research interests

  • Macroeconomics
  • Applied Microeconomics
  • Policy Evaluation

Key publications | Publications by category | Publications by year

Publications by category


Journal articles

Oyekola O (2023). Democracy does improve health. Social Indicators Research Abstract. DOI.
Oyèkọ́lá Ọ (2022). A cross-country analysis of the roles of border openness, human capital and legal institutions in explaining economic development. Journal of International Trade and Economic Development, 31(1), 75-108. Abstract. DOI.
Oyekola O, Meenagh D, Minford P (2022). Global Shocks in the US Economy: Effects on Output and the Real Exchange Rate. Open Economies Review Abstract. DOI.
Oyekola O (2022). How Resilient is the US Economy to Foreign Disturbances?. MATHEMATICS, 10(9). Author URL. DOI.
Oyèkọ́lá Ọ (2021). Finance and inequality in a panel of US States. Empirical Economics, 61(5), 2739-2795. Abstract. DOI.
Oyèkọ́lá Ọ (2021). Where do people live longer?. Research in Economics, 75(1), 21-44. Abstract. DOI.

Publications by year


2023

Oyekola O (2023). Democracy does improve health. Social Indicators Research Abstract. DOI.

2022

Oyèkọ́lá Ọ (2022). A cross-country analysis of the roles of border openness, human capital and legal institutions in explaining economic development. Journal of International Trade and Economic Development, 31(1), 75-108. Abstract. DOI.
Oyekola O, Meenagh D, Minford P (2022). Global Shocks in the US Economy: Effects on Output and the Real Exchange Rate. Open Economies Review Abstract. DOI.
Oyekola O (2022). God’s not dead, just overregulated: state history and the regulation of religion at various stages of development.  Abstract.
Oyekola O (2022). How Resilient is the US Economy to Foreign Disturbances?. MATHEMATICS, 10(9). Author URL. DOI.

2021

Oyèkọ́lá Ọ (2021). Finance and inequality in a panel of US States. Empirical Economics, 61(5), 2739-2795. Abstract. DOI.
Oyekola O (2021). Persistence of religious states.  Abstract.
Oyèkọ́lá Ọ (2021). Where do people live longer?. Research in Economics, 75(1), 21-44. Abstract. DOI.

2020

Oyekola O (2020). Life May be Unfair, But Do Democracies Make it Any Less Burdensome?.  Abstract.

2019

Oyekola O (2019). Democracy does improve health.  Abstract.

Administrative responsibilities

Academic Conduct Officer (ACO)