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Nicholas Lacourse

+44 (0) 1392 72


Hope Hall, University of Exeter, Prince of Wales Road, Exeter, EX4 4PL

Nicholas Lacourse obtained his BSc from Louisiana Tech University and his MA from the University of Missouri under the supervision of Ronald Harstad before coming to the University of Exeter. He is currently a doctoral student in Economics with disciplines in Game Theory and Behavioral Economics under the supervision of Dr. Grosskopf and Dr. Hauser.

Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Science - Economics - Louisiana Tech University (2015)
  • Master of Arts - Economics - University of Missouri (2018)

Career

Nicholas Lacourse seeks a balance in his future career and wants to focus on industry-tailored research specific to his work on rating system designs while also teaching online via multiple social media platforms.

Nicholas also hopes while working in the industry that he can help close the cooperative disconnect between academic research and private-sector research.

Research interests

  • Decision Theory
  • Game Theory
  • Behavioral Economics
  • Applied Microeconomics

 

Research projects

Nicholas's current project(s) are focused on rating system design and how mechanism design can play a role in understanding both the efficient and fair allocations of personal valuations in p2p systems with minimal social distance.

Furthermore, Nicholas is also working on some theory extensions to how nested game theoretical designs might play a role in rating systems and in doing so observing if there is room for new solution concepts when the degree of nestedness is finitely large.

Nicholas Lacourse has mainly taught modules on first year statistics and intro econometrics. However, a majority of Nicholas's teaching interests lie at the root of decision theory and where classical theories fall short. Nicholas also enjoys teaching microeconomics, behavioral economics, game theory, and the ideological structures of the differences in how rationality arises with respect to games e.g. logic of games versus logic as games.