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Dr Andrew Parker

Dr Andrew Parker

Senior Lecturer in Organisation Studies

3485

+44 (0) 1392 723485

1.48
Streatham Court, University of Exeter, Rennes Drive, Exeter, EX4 4PU, UK

Andrew Parker joined the Business School in February 2017 as a senior lecturer in organisation studies. His research uses the lens of network theory to better understand problem solving processes, innovation, knowledge transfer, turnover and performance within organizations. He has conducted social network analysis research in over 70 multinational organizations and government agencies.

He was a Senior Consultant at IBM’s Institute for Knowledge Management, a research fellow at the Network Roundtable at the University of Virginia as well as an advisor to the Knowledge and Innovation Network at Warwick Business School. In addition, he has recently been a visiting professor at MelNet, a network research group based at the University of Melbourne and a visiting professor at the University of Kentucky's LINKS Center for Social Network Analysis.

His research has appeared in Science, Journal of Management Studies, Organization Studies, Journal of Applied Psychology, Management Communication Quarterly, M@n@gement, Social Networks, Sloan Management Review, Organizational Dynamics and California Management Review. He is the co-author of The Hidden Power of Social Networks. He received his PhD from Stanford University.

Nationality: British, American

Qualifications

  • PhD Sociology (Stanford University)
  • MA Economics (Northeastern University)
  • MSc Development Studies (London School of Economics)
  • BSc Political Science (Northeastern University)

Research interests

  • Social networks
  • Problem solving
  • Energizing relationships

My recent published research examines how managers and employees can utilize their social networks --the relationships they have with other individuals-- to help them with their work. In particular, I focus on how managers can use their social networks to solve complex problems that result in creative and valuable solutions.  The fundamental challenge of problem solving is recombining diverse knowledge. However, diverse knowledge often resides outside an individual’s local work context. I examine the trade-off between obtaining relevant knowledge and the ability to recognize and assimilate the knowledge.

I am also interested in how an individual's energizing and de-energizing ties can influence their performance and their likelihood of staying or leaving an organization. We find that employees who perceive their interactions with others inside the organization as increasing their level of energy have a reduced likelihood of voluntary turnover. In contrast, when others within the organization perceive an individual as being de-energizing that individual is at higher risk of involuntary turnover. We have also found that de-energizing relationships in organizations are associated with decreased performance. However, the effects of de-energizing relationships on performance can be moderated by the extent to which an individual feels a sense of thriving (a feeling of vitality and learning) at work.

Research projects

Andrew is currently working on the following projects:

  • Network brokerage, helping and trust in organizations
  • The effect of extraversion on energizing interactions
  • The dynamics of advice seeking processes after an acquisition event
  • Network models for the analysis of social influence in organizations

Key publications | Publications by category | Publications by year

Key publications


Tippmann E, Sharkey Scott P, Parker A (2017). Boundary Capabilities in MNCs: Knowledge Transformation for Creative Solution Development. Journal of Management Studies, 54(4), 455-482. Full text. DOI.
Gerbasi A, Porath CL, Parker A, Spreitzer G, Cross R (2015). Destructive de-energizing relationships: How thriving buffers their effect on performance. Journal of Applied Psychology, 100(5), 1423-1433. Full text. DOI.
Parker A, Halgin DS, Borgatti SP (2015). Dynamics of Social Capital: Effects of Performance Feedback on Network Change. Organization Studies, 37(3), 375-397. Full text. DOI.

Publications by category


Books

Cross RL, Parker A (2004). The Hidden Power of Social Networks Understanding how Work Really Gets Done in Organizations., Harvard Business Press. Abstract.
Cross R, Parker A, Sasson L (2003). Networks in the Knowledge Economy., Oxford University Press. Abstract.

Journal articles

Tippmann E, Sharkey Scott P, Parker A (2017). Boundary Capabilities in MNCs: Knowledge Transformation for Creative Solution Development. Journal of Management Studies, 54(4), 455-482. Full text. DOI.
Shah NP, Parker A, Waldstrøm C (2016). Examining the overlap: Individual performance benefits of multiplex relationships. Management Communication Quarterly, 31, 5-38. Full text. DOI.
Kahn WA, Cross R, Parker A (2016). Layers of Diagnosis for Planned Relational Change in Organizations. The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, 39(3), 259-280. DOI.
Parker A, Gerbasi A (2016). The impact of energizing interactions on voluntary and involuntary turnover. M@n@gement, 19(3), 177-177. Full text. DOI.
Gerbasi A, Porath CL, Parker A, Spreitzer G, Cross R (2015). Destructive de-energizing relationships: How thriving buffers their effect on performance. Journal of Applied Psychology, 100(5), 1423-1433. Full text. DOI.
Parker A, Halgin DS, Borgatti SP (2015). Dynamics of Social Capital: Effects of Performance Feedback on Network Change. Organization Studies, 37(3), 375-397. Full text. DOI.
Parker A, Gerbasi A, Porath CL (2013). The effects of de-energizing ties in organizations and how to manage them. Organizational Dynamics, 42(2), 110-118. Full text. DOI.
Linder JC, Cross R, Parker A (2006). All charged up. Business Strategy Review, 17(3), 25-29. DOI.
Cross R, Laseter T, Parker A, Velasquez G (2006). Using Social Network Analysis to Improve Communities of Practice. California Management Review, 49(1), 32-60. Full text. DOI.
Cross R, Parker A (2004). Charged up: Creating energy in organizations. Journal of Organizational Excellence, 23(4), 3-14. DOI.
Rhoten D (2004). EDUCATION: Risks and Rewards of an Interdisciplinary Research Path. Science, 306(5704), 2046-2046. DOI.
Cross R, Baker W, Parker A (2003). What creates energy in organizations?. Mit Sloan Management Review, 44, 51-56.
Cross R, Parker A, Borgatti SP (2002). Making invisible work visible: Social network analysis and strategic collaboration. California Management Review, 44, 25-47. Full text. DOI.
Cross R, Nohria N, Parker A (2002). Six myths about informal networks - and how to overcome them. MIT Sloan Management Review, 43(3), 67-75. Abstract.
Cross R, Nohria N, Parker A (2002). Six myths about informal networks – and how to. overcome them. Mit Sloan Management Review, 43, 66-75.
Cross R, Borgatti SP, Parker A (2001). Beyond answers: dimensions of the advice network. Social Networks, 23(3), 215-235. DOI.
Cross R, Rice RE, Parker A (2001). Information seeking in social context: structural influences and receipt of information benefits. IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man and Cybernetics, Part C (Applications and Reviews), 31(4), 438-448. DOI.
Cross R, Parker A, Prusak L, Borgatti SP (2001). Knowing what we know: Supporting knowledge creation and sharing in social networks. Organizational Dynamics, 30(2), 100-120. DOI.
Cross R, Parker A, Prusak L, Borgatti SP (2001). Knowing what we know: Supporting knowledge creation and transfer in social networks. Organizational Dynamics, 30, 61-82.

Chapters

Carafa A, Assimakopoulos DG, Parker A (2014). Network evolution at the science- technology overlap in the triple helix of particle therapy of cancer. In  (Ed) Managing Emerging Technologies for Socio-Economic Impact, 115-152. DOI.
Cross R, Borgatti SP, Parker A (2005). Making Invisible Work Visible: Using Social Network Analysis to Support Strategic Collaboration. In  (Ed) Creating Value with Knowledge: Insights from the IBM Institute for Business Value.  Abstract. DOI.

Publications by year


2017

Tippmann E, Sharkey Scott P, Parker A (2017). Boundary Capabilities in MNCs: Knowledge Transformation for Creative Solution Development. Journal of Management Studies, 54(4), 455-482. Full text. DOI.

2016

Shah NP, Parker A, Waldstrøm C (2016). Examining the overlap: Individual performance benefits of multiplex relationships. Management Communication Quarterly, 31, 5-38. Full text. DOI.
Kahn WA, Cross R, Parker A (2016). Layers of Diagnosis for Planned Relational Change in Organizations. The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, 39(3), 259-280. DOI.
Parker A, Gerbasi A (2016). The impact of energizing interactions on voluntary and involuntary turnover. M@n@gement, 19(3), 177-177. Full text. DOI.

2015

Gerbasi A, Porath CL, Parker A, Spreitzer G, Cross R (2015). Destructive de-energizing relationships: How thriving buffers their effect on performance. Journal of Applied Psychology, 100(5), 1423-1433. Full text. DOI.
Parker A, Halgin DS, Borgatti SP (2015). Dynamics of Social Capital: Effects of Performance Feedback on Network Change. Organization Studies, 37(3), 375-397. Full text. DOI.

2014

Carafa A, Assimakopoulos DG, Parker A (2014). Network evolution at the science- technology overlap in the triple helix of particle therapy of cancer. In  (Ed) Managing Emerging Technologies for Socio-Economic Impact, 115-152. DOI.

2013

Parker A, Gerbasi A, Porath CL (2013). The effects of de-energizing ties in organizations and how to manage them. Organizational Dynamics, 42(2), 110-118. Full text. DOI.

2006

Linder JC, Cross R, Parker A (2006). All charged up. Business Strategy Review, 17(3), 25-29. DOI.
Cross R, Laseter T, Parker A, Velasquez G (2006). Using Social Network Analysis to Improve Communities of Practice. California Management Review, 49(1), 32-60. Full text. DOI.

2005

Cross R, Borgatti SP, Parker A (2005). Making Invisible Work Visible: Using Social Network Analysis to Support Strategic Collaboration. In  (Ed) Creating Value with Knowledge: Insights from the IBM Institute for Business Value.  Abstract. DOI.

2004

Cross R, Parker A (2004). Charged up: Creating energy in organizations. Journal of Organizational Excellence, 23(4), 3-14. DOI.
Rhoten D (2004). EDUCATION: Risks and Rewards of an Interdisciplinary Research Path. Science, 306(5704), 2046-2046. DOI.
Cross RL, Parker A (2004). The Hidden Power of Social Networks Understanding how Work Really Gets Done in Organizations., Harvard Business Press. Abstract.

2003

Cross R, Parker A, Sasson L (2003). Networks in the Knowledge Economy., Oxford University Press. Abstract.
Cross R, Baker W, Parker A (2003). What creates energy in organizations?. Mit Sloan Management Review, 44, 51-56.

2002

Cross R, Parker A, Borgatti SP (2002). Making invisible work visible: Social network analysis and strategic collaboration. California Management Review, 44, 25-47. Full text. DOI.
Cross R, Nohria N, Parker A (2002). Six myths about informal networks - and how to overcome them. MIT Sloan Management Review, 43(3), 67-75. Abstract.
Cross R, Nohria N, Parker A (2002). Six myths about informal networks – and how to. overcome them. Mit Sloan Management Review, 43, 66-75.

2001

Cross R, Borgatti SP, Parker A (2001). Beyond answers: dimensions of the advice network. Social Networks, 23(3), 215-235. DOI.
Cross R, Rice RE, Parker A (2001). Information seeking in social context: structural influences and receipt of information benefits. IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man and Cybernetics, Part C (Applications and Reviews), 31(4), 438-448. DOI.
Cross R, Parker A, Prusak L, Borgatti SP (2001). Knowing what we know: Supporting knowledge creation and sharing in social networks. Organizational Dynamics, 30(2), 100-120. DOI.
Cross R, Parker A, Prusak L, Borgatti SP (2001). Knowing what we know: Supporting knowledge creation and transfer in social networks. Organizational Dynamics, 30, 61-82.

External positions

  • Founding member of the Connected Commons
  • Visiting professor at the University of Kentucky's LINKS Center for Social Network Analysis

My teaching interests are focused on organisational behaviour. My courses have examined leadership, problem solving, motivation, developing high-performance teams, and driving organisational change. I have also taught organisational theory and social network theory and methods.

In my teaching I like to build a solid theoretical foundation for each concept and then bring the ideas to life with examples from case studies, video clips, and my own research and consulting experience.

Modules

2017/18